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Where will this course lead?

The National Extended Diploma in Forensic and Criminal Investigation is the main qualification studied in the second year of a Level 3 Programme of Study in Forensic and Criminal Investigation. It is the perfect qualification for students who want to continue their level 3 studies in science following their study of a National Foundation Diploma in Forensic Investigation and provides learners with a range of experiences to prepare them for progression into University Level Education or employment.

What will I study?

While on the second year of the National Extended Diploma, you will study the following mandatory units:

- Applications of Criminology
- Criminal Investigation Procedures in Practice
- Applications of Criminal and Forensic Psychology

You will also study a number of optional units to include practical science and forensic applications

How will this course be delivered?

The second year of this course is delivered through a series of seven Units composed of both practical and theoretical components.  Delivery will be through student-centred lessons, complemented by interactive, computer-based activities and practical work.  A high degree of importance is placed on the development of the analytical skills students will be required to use in higher study and/or future employment in related roles.

What qualifications will I get?

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Forensic and Criminal Investigation.

How will I be assessed?

Some units are internally assessed through coursework set and marked by the subject teachers.  Two units are assessed externally through a task book completed in exam conditions and set by the awarding body (Pearson).  All assessments are marked against Pass, Merit and Distinction criteria to determine an overall grade for each Unit.

How do I get a place on the course?

Successful completion of the Level 3 National Foundation Diploma in Forensic Investigation with a Merit grade or higher, plus meeting further entry requirements related to attendance and a mature approach to learning.

What are the entry requirements?

Merit Grade or higher on Level 3 National Foundation Diploma in Forensic Investigation

What else do I need to know?

You will undertake a wide range of practical investigations, through which good laboratory and investigative practice will be developed.

All laboratory safety equipment will be provided by the College.

You will undertake a 1 week work placement during each year of the course.

If you have a Learning Difficulty or Disability or Additional Educational Need, please let us know when you apply. You will be offered support in your interview. If you need help completing your application, we can also assist you with this.

Fees are not applicable to 16-18 year olds.

You may be required to make set contributions towards educational trips and/or travel expenses to local events.

What can I do after this course?

During the second year of your National Extended Diploma in Forensic and Criminal Investigation, you will be supported through a UCAS application if you choose to apply for a University Level course. Alternatively, you could look to enter related employment in a technical role.

Location

Blossomfield Campus

Start Date

Sept-2023

Day

Various

Time

TBC

Course Fee

N/A For 16 to 18 Year Olds

Course Code

SCAFA021BCF0

Study Mode

Full time

Psychologist

Psychologists research, study and assess emotional, cognitive and behavioural processes and abnormalities in human beings and animals and how these are affected by genetic, physical and social factors.

What’s Involved?

Psychologists develop and administer tests to measure intelligence, abilities, aptitudes, etc. and assess results. They develop treatments and guidance methods and give treatment or guidance using a variety of therapy and counselling techniques. They observe and experiment on humans and animals to measure mental and physical characteristics. They also analyse the effect of hereditary, social and physical factors on thought and behaviour. They study psychological factors in the treatment and prevention of mental illness or emotional and personality disorders. They also maintain required contacts with family members, education or other health professionals, as appropriate, and recommend possible solutions to problems presented. They apply professional knowledge and techniques within the workplace, addressing issues such as job design, work groups, motivation etc. They apply psychological treatment methods to help athletes achieve optimum mental health and enhance sporting performance.

Biochemist

Biological scientists and biochemists examine and investigate the morphology, structure, chemistry and physical characteristics of living organisms, including their inter-relationships, environments and diseases.

What’s Involved?

Biochemists study the physical and chemical form, structure, composition and function of living organisms; They identify and study the chemical substances, including microbial infections, involved in physiological processes and the progress of disease; They also perform tests to study physiological and pathological characteristics within cells and other organisms; They researche the effects of internal and external environmental factors on the life processes and other functions of living organisms; They observe the structure of communities of organisms in the laboratory and in their natural environment; They also advise farmers, medical staff and others, on the nature of field crops, livestock and produce and on the treatment and prevention of disease; They monitor the distribution, presence and behaviour of plants, animals and aquatic life, and performs other scientific tasks related to conservation not performed by jobholders in MINOR GROUP 214: Conservation and Environment Professionals.

Chemical Process Operative

Job holders in this unit group operate plant and machinery in the processing of chemical and related materials by chemical, heat or other treatment, manufacture synthetic materials and bleach, dye or otherwise treat textiles, and treat hides, skins and pelts for making into fur, leather and skin products.

What’s Involved?

Chemical Process Operatives load prescribed quantities of ingredients into plant equipment, starts operational cycle, monitors instruments and gauges indicating conditions affecting the operation of the plant and adjusts controls as necessary; They prepare dye, bleaching, water repellent, fixing salt and other chemical solutions to finish and treat textiles; They also regulate input of polymer into melting unit, extrude polymer, gather extruded filaments and feed strands through rolling, cutting and treatment units to produce synthetic fibre; They operate kilns, furnaces and ovens to produce charcoal, coke and other carbon products; They operate machines to coat film and tape with sensitising material and otherwise impregnate materials by immersion, split mould mica and produce asbestos pipes and sheets; cuts and trims skins, hides and pelts, removes wool, hair, flesh and other waste material, and washes, limes, tans, dyes and otherwise treats hides for making into leather, skin and fur products; withdraws samples for quality control testing, removes and regulates discharge of batch material upon completion of processing.

Chemical Engineer

Chemical Engineers and Production and Process engineers advise on and direct technical aspects of production programmes to ensure cost-effectiveness and efficiency. This unit group incorporates: planning and quality control engineers who plan production schedules, work sequences, and manufacturing and processing procedures to ensure accuracy, quality and reliability; and chemical engineers who undertake research on commercial scale chemical processes and processed products, design and provide specifications and direct the construction, operation, maintenance and repair of chemical plants and control systems.

What’s Involved?

A Chemical Engineer studies existing and alternative production methods, regarding work flow, plant layout, types of machinery and cost; recommends optimum equipment and layout and prepares drawings and specifications; devises and implements production control methods to monitor operational efficiency; investigates and eliminates potential hazards and bottlenecks in production; advises management on and ensures effective implementation of new production methods, techniques and equipment; liaises with materials buying, storing and controlling departments to ensure a steady flow of supplies; undertakes research and develops processes to achieve physical and/or chemical change for oil, pharmaceutical, synthetic, plastic, food and other products; designs, controls and constructs process plants to manufacture products.

Pharmacist

Pharmacists dispense drugs and medicaments in hospitals and pharmacies and advise on and participate in the development and testing of new drugs, compounds and therapies. They counsel on the proper use and adverse effects of drugs and medicines.

What’s Involved?

Pharmacists prepare or direct the preparation of prescribed medicaments in liquid, powder, tablet, ointment or other form following prescriptions issued by medical doctors and other health professionals; They advise health professionals on the selection and appropriate use of medicines; They also highlight a drug's potential side effects, identifies harmful interactions with other drugs and assesses the suitability of treatments for patients with particular health conditions; Pharmacists check that recommended doses are not being exceeded and that instructions are understood by patients; They maintain prescription files and records issue of narcotics, poisons and other habit-forming drugs; They also liaise with other professionals regarding the development, manufacturing and testing of drugs; They test and analyse drugs to determine their identity, purity and strength; They ensure that drugs and medicaments are in good supply and are stored properly.

Chemical Scientist

Chemical scientists analyse and research physical aspects of chemical structure and change within substances and develop chemical techniques used in the manufacture or modification of natural substances and processed products.

What’s Involved?

Chemical Scientists develop experimental procedures, instruments and recording and testing systems; conducts experiments to identify chemical composition, energy and chemical changes in natural substances and processed materials; analyses results and experimental data; tests techniques and processes for reliability under a variety of conditions; develops procedures for quality control of manufactured products.

Laboratory Technician

Laboratory technicians carry out routine laboratory tests and checks, and perform a variety of technical support functions requiring the application of established or prescribed procedures and techniques to assist scientists with their research, development, analysis and testing, and to verify the physical, chemical and other characteristics of materials and products.

What’s Involved?

A Laboratory Technician sets up and assists with the construction and the development of scientific apparatus for experimental, demonstration or other purposes; prepares and analyses body fluids, secretions and/or tissue to detect infections or to examine the effects of different drugs; grows cultures of bacteria and viruses, prepares tissue sections and other organic and inorganic material for examination and stains and fixes slides for microscope work; operates and services specialised scientific equipment, undertakes prescribed measurements and analyses and ensures that sterile conditions necessary for some equipment are maintained; records and collates data obtained from experimental work and documents all work carried out.

Physical Scientist

Physical scientists study relationships between matter, energy and other physical phenomena, the nature, composition and structure of the Earth and other planetary bodies and forecast weather conditions and electrical, magnetic, seismic and thermal activity. This can include job roles such as Geologist, Geophysicist, Medical Physicist, Meteorologist, Oceanographer, Physicist and Seismologist.

What’s Involved?

A Physical Scientists conducts experiments and tests and uses mathematical models and theories to investigate the structure and properties of matter, transformations and propagations of energy, the behaviour of particles and their interaction with various forms of energy; uses surveys, seismology and other methods to determine the earth's mantle, crust, rock structure and type, and to analyse and predict the occurrence of seismological activity; observes, records and collates data on atmospheric conditions from weather stations, satellites, and observation vessels to plot and forecast weather conditions; applies mathematical models and techniques to assist in the solution of scientific problems in industry and commerce and seeks out new applications of mathematical analysis.

Biomedical Scientist

Biomedical scientists examine and investigate the morphology, structure, chemistry and physical characteristics of living organisms, including their inter-relationships, environments and diseases.

What’s Involved?

A Biomedical Scientist studies the physical and chemical form, structure, composition and function of living organisms; identifies and studies the chemical substances, including microbial infections, involved in physiological processes and the progress of disease; performs tests to study physiological and pathological characteristics within cells and other organisms; researches the effects of internal and external environmental factors on the life processes and other functions of living organisms; observes the structure of communities of organisms in the laboratory and in their natural environment; advises farmers, medical staff and others, on the nature of field crops, livestock and produce and on the treatment and prevention of disease; monitors the distribution, presence and behaviour of plants, animals and aquatic life, and performs other scientific tasks related to conservation.

Radiographer

Medical (diagnostic) radiographers operate x-ray machines, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging and other imaging devices for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, assist in the diagnosis of injuries and diseases and are involved in intervention procedures such as the removal of kidney stones. They operate under the supervision of senior staff. Therapeutic radiographers specialise in the planning and administration of radiotherapy treatment for patients with cancer.

What’s Involved?

A Radiographer uses a range of imaging devices for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes; assesses patients and interprets clinical requirements to determine appropriate radiographic treatments; verifies identity of patient and ensures that necessary preparations have been made for the examination/treatment; decides length and intensity of exposure or strength of dosage of isotope; positions patient and operates x-ray, scanning or fluoroscopic equipment; maintains records of all radiographic/therapeutic work undertaken; plans course of treatment with clinical oncologists and physicists; calculates radiation dosage and maps volume to be treated; explains treatment to patient and management of any side effects; carries out post-treatment reviews and follow-ups.

Botanist

Botanists fall under the category of Biological scientists and Biochemists. They examine and investigate the morphology, structure, chemistry and physical characteristics of living organisms, including their inter-relationships, environments and diseases.

What’s Involved?

Biological scientists and Biochemists study the physical and chemical form, structure, composition and function of living organisms; They identify and study the chemical substances, including microbial infections, involved in physiological processes and the progress of disease; They also perform tests to study physiological and pathological characteristics within cells and other organisms; They research the effects of internal and external environmental factors on the life processes and other functions of living organisms; They also observe the structure of communities of organisms in the laboratory and in their natural environment; They advise farmers, medical staff and others, on the nature of field crops, livestock and produce and on the treatment and prevention of disease; They monitor the distribution, presence and behaviour of plants, animals and aquatic life.

Forensic Scientist

Forensic Scientists provide scientific evidence for use in courts of law to support the prosecution or defence in criminal and civil investigations. This involves searching for and examining contact trace material associated with crimes. This material can include blood and other body fluids, hairs, fibres from clothing, paint and glass fragments, tyre marks, flammable substances used to start fires and more.

What’s Involved?

Forensic Scientists analyse samples such as hair, body fluids, glass, paint and drugs, in the laboratory, apply techniques such as gas and high-performance liquid chromatography, scanning electron microscopy, mass spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy and genetic fingerprinting, sift and sort evidence often held in miniscule quantities, record findings and collect trace evidence from scenes of crimes or accidents, attend and examine scenes of crimes liaise with teams and coordinate with outside agencies such as the police and analyse and interpret results and computer data.

Criminologist

Criminologists examine all aspects of crime and find ways to prevent criminal behaviour. Criminologists gather statistics and identify patterns. They look at types of crimes as well as demographics and locations. A criminologist's job is mostly research driven, and their research might be conducted in an office setting or the in the field.

What’s Involved?

Criminologists compile statistical data, conduct surveys, conduct research interviews, formulate policy recommendations, write research papers and articles, work with law enforcement and corrections personnel, study criminal behaviour and devise strategy to help reduce crime.

Predicted Employment

How much can I earn?

£17,680
NATIONAL AVERAGE

Employment by Region

The career paths provided are to give you an idea of the careers that you could progress onto in the future. However, for some, you may need to complete higher level qualifications and gain experience before your dream job becomes a reality. The information provided is to support further research and to generate some initial career ideas when choosing a course. Please check entry requirements to degree courses, apprenticeships, and jobs as this may vary from year to year and across providers. For further advice and guidance, please contact: careers@solihull.ac.uk.